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John Clifford Primary & Nursery School ‘Be your best. Celebrate success. Together we will be successful.’

MUSIC

Music WC 13.7.20 

 

We have spent the last half term listening to and appraising music inspired by bees and flowers. Now it is your turn to create a flowery piece of music. Now, you don’t have to be Mozart, although some of you may be just as talented. You can use instruments if you have them, especially if you take lessons in or out of school. You could make instruments out of everyday objects, if you’re feeling crafty there are plenty of ideas you could adapt at home here https://artsycraftsymom.com/diy-musical-instruments-for-kids-to-make-and-play/, or you could use the instrument we all have at our disposal... your voice, you could hum, sing, beat box, growl, whatever you feel fits! 

 

To inspire you, watch this video (best with sound turned off as it already has a piece of music playing over it) and think about where you feel your piece of music might crescendo (slowly grow louder), where it might be played adagio (slowly) and when it might be played allegro (brisk, happy and fast). 

Time-Lapse: Watch Flowers Bloom Before Your Eyes | Short Film Showcase

Witness dozens of different types of flowers unfurling in this stunning time-lapse video from filmmaker David de los Santos Gil. He used 5,000 out of 50,000 ...

We would love to hear your finished piece! Do send it over to us by emailing it to

 stayintouch@johnclifford.notts.sch.uk

Music WC 6.7.20 

 

Listen and Appraise

 

This week we are listening to another classical piece inspired by flowers, Crisantemi (chrysanthemums) by Giacomo Puccini. 

 

Puccini was an Italian Composer who was primarily known for writing operas. However, Crisantemi is a piece written for a string quartet in 1890, inspired by beautiful, bright yellow chrysanthemums. 

 

Here is the piece performed by Enso String Quartet 

Puccini "Crisantemi" performed by the Enso String Quartet

Once you have listened, answer these questions: 

 

“What can you hear?”   

Focus the discussion around instruments, texture, tempo and the other interrelated dimensions of music.  

“How does the music make you feel?”   

Everybody will feel differently. Music brings many emotions along with it and often each person feels something different.   

“How old do you think this music is?”   

When do you think the music was composed? Can you think of a period of time it might have been composed in?  

“Does the music tell a story?” Use your imaginations, remember that music can send your imagination flying.   

“Do you like the music?”   

It doesn’t matter if you or don’t, there is no correct answer to this question and you might change your mind next time you listen. 

 

You could fill in this sheet too if you’d like to: 

Music WC 29.6.20 

 

Listen and Appraise 

 

This week we are listening to a song from a musical. You may have seen it before (especially if your grown-ups watched it when they were little like I did!). 

The song is Edelweiss from ‘The Sound of Music’. 

 

It is named after the edelweiss, a white flower found high in the Alps. It is part of the daisy and sunflower family. 

The song was written by Rogers and Hammerstein for the broadway show ‘The Sound of Music’ before it was made into a film. It is sung by Captain Vonn Trapp in both the play and the film. In the version below it is sung by the actor Christopher Plummer in the film. 

 

Watch the video and then think about the questions below. 

The Sound of Music - Edelweiss

“What can you hear?”   

Focus the discussion around instruments, texture, tempo and the other interrelated dimensions of music.  

“How does the music make you feel?”   

Everybody will feel differently. Music brings many emotions along with it and often each person feels something different.   

“How old do you think this music is?”   

When do you think the music was composed? Can you think of a period of time it might have been composed in?  

“Does the music tell a story?” Use your imaginations, remember that music can send your imagination flying.   

“Do you like the music?”   

It doesn’t matter if you or don’t, there is no correct answer to this question and you might change your mind next time you listen. 

 

You could fill in this sheet too if you’d like to: 

Music WC 22.6.20 

 

We have another piece of music inspired by flowers this week, ‘Flower Duet’ by French composer Léo Delibes from the opera Lakmé. 

 

Lakmé is a tragic opera set in the Orient, a place known for its beautiful flowers – hence the title of this duet. It was based on a novel by Pierre Loti. This opera tells a story about tragic love between the daughter of a Hindu priest and a British military officer during the British Raj in India in the 19th century, this type of relationship was forbidden in colonial India, and her father wasn’t happy with it. The story ends with the officer falling out of love and going back to swear duty to his job, and with Lakmé, sadly killing herself with poison. 

 

The duet takes place in the drama’s first act of the three-act opera, between characters: the principal character Lakmé (Soprano), and her servant Mallika (mezzo-soprano), as they go down to the banks of a river to gather flowers, describing the white jasmine, roses, and other flowers that adorn the riverbanks. It is popular as a concert piece and the exciting, exotic music is light, delicate and instantly beautiful, much like the flowers it depicts. 

 

The music has appeared in lots of adverts and TV shows so you’ll probably recognise it! Can you believe it was even in The Angry Birds Movie? 

 

Watch the video and think about the question below. 

 

https://vimeo.com/301604909 

 

“What can you hear?”   

Focus the discussion around instruments, texture, tempo and the other interrelated dimensions of music.  

“How does the music make you feel?”   

Everybody will feel differently. Music brings many emotions along with it and often each person feels something different.   

“How old do you think this music is?”   

When do you think the music was composed? Can you think of a period of time it might have been composed in?  

“Does the music tell a story?” Use your imaginations, remember that music can send your imagination flying.   

“Do you like the music?”   

It doesn’t matter if you or don’t, there is no correct answer to this question and you might change your mind next time you listen. 

 

Here’s a lovely video by a lady called Teiya Kasahara performing the piece in Toronto during lockdown. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=loHU8dFLU2w 

Hey Everyone,

 

This Friday sees another chance to have a school sing-along.

 

Mrs Bailey and myself will look forward to seeing and hearing you again.

 

This week, I'd like to hear from you on what you'd like to sing. To do that, take a look at our SINGING AT JOHN CLIFFORD page on the school website. Here it is:

 

https://www.johncliffordschool.com/ks1-choir-junior-rock-choir/

 

Please, click on my name on the school blog and leave me a personal message of what it is you'd like to sing.

 

Until Friday, have a good go at listening to Proud by Heather Small. We'll definitely be singing that.

 

Take care until then.

 

Mr P

Music WC 15.06.20

 

Classical music  

The term 'Classical music' has come to be known as a term for music that spans the course of hundreds of years, in. It is music that has been composed by musicians who are trained in writing music down using music notation so that other musicians can play it. Many people are unaware that Classical music is still being composed today, although it is very different from what was created several hundred years ago. 

Listen to ‘Waltz of the Flowers’ by Tchaikovsky from ‘The Nutcracker’. Clear you mind when you’re listening to the music, I find it helps to close your eyes. 

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05dtrxx 

 

Listen again whilst thinking about the following questions, you can note down your responses in your homework book. 

 

“What can you hear?”  

 Focus the discussion around instruments, texture, tempo and the other interrelated dimensions of music. 

“How does the music make you feel?”  

Everybody will feel differently. Music brings many emotions along with it and often each person feels something different.  

“How old do you think this music is?”  

When do you think the music was composed? Can you think of a period of time it might have been composed in? 

“Does the music tell a story?” Use your imaginations, remember that music can send your imagination flying.  

“Do you like the music?”  

It doesn’t matter if you or don’t, there is no correct answer to this question and you might change your mind next time you listen. 

 

Here are two very different video interpretations of the piece of music, one by the Berlin State Ballet and the other by Disney’s Fantasia, which do you prefer? 

Waltz of the Flowers (Berlin State Ballet)

Waltz of the Flowers (Disney's Fantasia)

Music - WC 8.6.20 

 

This week we’d like you to have a go at creating a video of you playing along to ‘Flight of the Bumblebee’. Now, it is a very technical piece of music so we are not expecting you to learn how to play it in a week, instead we would like to see videos of you playing along to it. We are looking for the most creative ways of doing this that represent the pace and tempo of the music.

 

Here are some videos of different groups of people playing the piece of music, could you recreate one of these or come up with something of your own? 

Flight of the Bumblebee - Rimsky-Korsakov (arr. Rachmaninoff)

Flight of the Bumblebee - Rimsky-Korsakov (arr. Rachmaninoff) Click the 🔔bell to always be notified on new uploads! ♫ Listen on Spotify: http://spoti.fi/2Ldp...

Flight of the Bumble Bee xylophone

Flight of the Bumblebee - Canadian Brass

iTunes - http://bit.ly/Ie4Umf CD - http://bit.ly/VgXDHy Sheet Music - http://bit.ly/XosPml & http://bit.ly/Zbw4D1 (Tuba Bumblebee BQ version) This 2012 video...

Flight Of The Bumble Bee - Guitar Performance With Nick Andrew Licklibrary

http://bit.ly/FlightOfBumblebee_Lesson Watch Nick Andrew's version of Flight Of The Bumble Bee by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov on guitar. You can learn how to pla...

The Flight of the Bumble Bee - Flute, James Galway

Rimsky Korsakov - The Flight of the Bumble Bee Played by James Galway on the flute Pianist-Phillip Moll James Galway's recital in Belfast, Waterfront Hall

Music - Week commencing 1.6.20

 

As with most of the other subjects this week, we are looking at a piece of music all about..... BEES!

 

(you guessed it!)     

 

The piece we're looking at is called 'Flight of the Bumblebee' by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.

 

Here is the piece performed by the Lee Symphony Orchestra accompanied by a short animation.

Flight of the Bumblebee Animated in Color

Have a listen to the piece and answer these questions in your homework book.

 

1. Various instruments play the music in this piece. Can you tell what they are? Hint: listen for a violin, a flute and  groups of strings.

 

2. How does the composer make the bee “buzz?” He writes a series of notes that are all the same, then puts an accent on the next one that is just a tiny bit higher.

 

Why not challenge yourself to either recreate the 'Flight of the Bumblebee' or create your own bee inspired piece using any instruments you have in your house. You could even make instruments by using household objects. Don't forget the instrument we all have - our voices!

 

If you are happy with your piece you could even record it and post a link to the blog or email to your teachers at stayintouch@johnclifford.notts.sch.uk

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