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John Clifford Primary & Nursery School ‘Be your best. Celebrate success. Together we will be successful.’

Science

Science: w/c 13th July 

WALT: Save Our Planet PART 2

 

Last week, I asked you to watch this video link:

 

https://www.ourplanet.com/en/video/how-to-save-our-planet

 

Each one is narrated by the very brilliant Sir David Attenborough. I asked you to pick one, watch it, learn from it, take notes on it, build up a strong bank of words and phrases and then begin to put together an argument as to why we need to save our planet. This your second week. So, this week’s work is put together a balanced argument to present your case about why we need to save the planet after using one of the videos as inspiration.

 

Then, you will need to record yourself presenting your argument in the most passionate and persuasive manner possible.

 

Use this organiser to help with your ideas. Remember to base your ideas around your theme.

 

 

So, this week, you need to:

  1. Watch your video again and finish your notes
  2. Use your notes to write a script for your argument to present to me.
  3. Use your extra research if you’d like. Remember, the more you know the better your argument will be. 
  4. Practise your argument in front of your family and take advice from them on how to improve.
  5. Practise some more.
  6. Ask an adult to video your argument and upload it onto our class blogs for me to watch.

 

I’ll look forward to seeing your argument videos. These should be great!

 

 

 

Science: w/c 6th July 

WALT: Save Our Planet

 

Last week, you completed a poster to promote the conservation of the coral reef based on one of the videos celebrating projects around the globe doing just that.

 

In our English and Topic lessons we are moving towards reporting through newspapers and through television. These activities are aimed to get you ready to present an argument about how you think our planet can be saved. 

 

There is a link to click onto below that will present to you 5 more videos to watch aimed at saving our planet. Each one is narrated by the very brilliant Sir David Attenborough. What I want you to do is pick one, watch it, learn from it, take notes on it, build up a strong bank of words and phrases and then begin to put together an argument as to why we need to save our planet. Now, this activity is to be spread over 2 weeks. This week’s work is to give you the opportunity to build up some good background knowledge to help you write a balanced argument to then present it with a video using whatever resources or props you’d like.

 

This should prove to be a great way of ending our topic on conservation.

 

So, this week, to reiterate:

  1. Click the link
  2. Choose a video after watching all of them if you like.
  3. Take notes, learn from it, become an expert on it to fill your mind with as much information to retrieve as possible.
  4. Do extra research if you’d like. The more you know the better your argument will be. Believe me when I say that.

 

I’ll look forward to seeing your notes, research and ideas about your argument when you post them onto the class blogs.

 

https://www.ourplanet.com/en/video/how-to-save-our-planet

Fun Extension Activities

Here are some additional sheets for you to have some fun with that relate to saving our planet.

 

These can be printed out for you to use. Unfortunately, not all of them, however, can be viewed and used, because they might need your answers written on the actual sheets.

 

See what you can do.

Science: w/c 29th June 

WALT: Create an informative poster to promote the conservation of coral reefs.

 

Last week, I asked you to visit a website all about 5 inspiring coral reef restoration projects and write me a paragraph telling me which you find most inspiring/ground-breaking/important a then explaining why. Which was your favourite?

 

It is important to know the answer to that question because I would like you to create an informative poster promoting your favourite project. In our story this week, Michael writes an account of him meeting the whale and all that came from it. He was detailed in his description and it really made an impact on his teacher and class.

 

Could you make a poster about coral reef conservation and make an impact on me OR someone else?

 

I’ll look forward to seeing how impacting your poster is and how it will make me want to save coral reefs by supporting your favourite project from the YouTube video.

Science: w/c 22nd June 

WALT: To how endangered coral reefs are being saved around the world

 

 

This weeks reading from our book, This Morning I Met A Whale, by Michael Morpurgo, mentions how coral reefs are in danger and how important it is to save them.

 

(You will find this week's reading here along with images from the text to help you see what the boy saw in his mind) https://john-clifford-school.primarysite.media/media/the-morning-i-met-a-whale-pt-3 )

 

Your task, this week, is to visit a website all about 5 inspiring coral reef restoration projects and write me a paragraph telling me which you find most inspiring/groundbreaking/important a then explaining why. I think the 5 ideas are wonderful examples of how humans can make a change and help save the species on our planet that are in the most danger of dying out.

 

Some are short and one is 20 minutes long BUT they are worth it and make sure you have the subtitles turned on just in case a conservationist isn't speaking English.

 

https://www.suunto.com/en-gb/sports/News-Articles-container-page/5-inspiring-coral-reef-restoration-projects/

Science: w/c 15th June 

WALT: To understand how whales keep warm in very cold conditions

The animals of the Arctic and Antarctic circles spend their lives surviving subfreezing air temperatures and frigid water. Their secret is blubber, a thick layer of body fat that comprises up to 50% of some marine mammals. Is there any way for humans to replicate this cold-weather adaptation? With the Blubber Glove experiment, you’ll test a blubber substitute on a small scale and see what it’s like to take a dip in cold water without turning into a human ice lollipop.

 

Watch this video to help you conduct it.

Blubber Glove Experiment

Here is a sheet for you to follow of the same experiment. I can't wait to see how you get on. 

 

Please share some photos of your time with a supervising adult making your blubber glove.

 

What have you learned from completing the experiment?

Blubber Glove Experiment

Science: w/c 8th June 

WALT: To research and record the life cycle of a whale. 

Following on from your research about whales, this week in Science we would like you to research and record the life cycle of a whale.  

You can use the templates below to help you to set out your pictures and we would like you to write notes about each stage of the life cycle to demonstrate your research. You could print pictures from the internet or draw the whale at each stage. The presentation is up to you but please see the examples below for ideas of how to present your life-cycle with notes: 

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Science: w/c 1st June  

WALT: To research and produce a fact file about whales. 

As our topic book is based on a five metre northern bottle-nosed whale that became beached on the banks of the river Thames in 2006, we would like you to research whales for Science this week. 

Please use non-fiction books and internet research to complete the following fact file about a whale: 

Remember, when note taking you are not required to write in full sentences or copy chucks of information and it’s a good idea to use bullet points to set out your key notes. 

For example, 

  • Whales are mammals because they give birth to live young and feed their babies milk from mammary glands. 

  • Whales are warm blooded, which means they keep a high body temperature that does not change in the cold water. 

  • Blue whales can grow to be about 100 feet (30.5 meters) in length and may weigh around 160 tons. 

 

Please watch the video below for note taking tips: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=Q3S1chdLhhw&feature=emb_title 

The following pages and links will be a good place to start your research:

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